Philippine Banknotes: 50 Piso New Generation Currency

2010 was when Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) rolled out the New Generation Currency (NGC) notes. 2007 was the year the new notes were conceptualized. It was to replace the New Design Series (NDS) notes that are in circulation since 1985. As of this date, BSP has stopped printing the New Design Series notes and will be completely demonetized by 2017.

The New Generation Currency notes feature the same heroes in the obverse. On the reverse, prominent, iconic, and historical places in the country, instead of events and buildings in the NDS notes. BSP was very keen in adding new security features never before seen in Philippine currency.

The color theme for each note remains the same from the NDS notes. Orange for the 20 Pesos, red for the 50, violet for the 100, green for 200, yellow for 500, and blue for the 1000 Pesos.

Featured here is the 50 Piso New Generation Currency note.

50 Pesos New Generation Currency Banknote Obverse

50 Piso New Generation Currency note
OBVERSE

“REPUBLIKA NG PILIPINAS”
“ANG SALAPING ITO AY BAYARIN NG BANGKO SENTRAL AT PINANANAGUTAN NG REPIBLIKA NG PILIPINAS”
“PINAGPALA ANG BAYAN NA ANG DIYOS AY ANG PANGINOON”
(Lit. “Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord”)
“LIMAMPUNG PISO”

Logo:
Seal of The Republic of the Philippines
BSP Logo

Portrait:
SERGIO OSMEÑA

Other Images:
LEYTE LANDING
FIRST NATIONAL ASSEMBLY 1907

50 Pesos New Generation Currency Banknote Reverse

50 Piso New Generation Currency note
REVERSE

“Taal Lake”
“Maliputo | Caranx ignobilis”
“LIMAMPUNG PISO”

Featured Symbol of nature: Maliputo

Lacework design origin: Batangas

Outline of the Philippine map with a dot marking the location of Taal Lake.

The 50 Piso NGC baknote with its predominantly red color features the Taal lake on its reverse where the famous Taal volcano is located. Its a popular tourist spot that is just a few hours drive to the south Metro Manila.

The fish featured on the reverse of the banknote is locally called “Maliputo“,  and is a fresh water variant of the marine fish known as the Giant trevally or “talakitok“. How they came to live in the land-locked, freshwater lake of Taal is unknown. It’s said that they were plentiful in the Taal lake, but numbers have been dwindling in recent years.

Enjoy!

~ by MAV on September 30, 2015.

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